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HAJJ MUBARAK

“HAJJ MUBARAK”

Hajj Mubarak | Haj wallpaper and quotes free download | Religious Quotes

Eid ul Adha is a significant festival for Muslims, commemorating the willingness of Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) to sacrifice his son in obedience to Allah. When Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) is about to sacrifice Hazrat Ismail (AS), Allah stops him and sends the Angel Jibreel (AS) with a ram to sacrifice instead. This act of sacrifice is remembered and celebrated as Eid ul Adha, which follows the final day of the Hajj pilgrimage. Though it follows Hajj, it has no direct connection to it.

May Allah’s blessing light your way, strengthen your faith, and bring joy to your heart as you praise and serve today, tomorrow, and always.

“Hajj offered with all its requirements is reward with paradise”

EID UL ADHA

Eid al-Adha, or 9 Zil HAJJ, or Festival of Allah, signifies the consent of Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) to sacrifice his son Hazrat Ismail (AS) according to Allah’s command. 9 Zil HAJJ is the most important holiday in Islam. This Eid ul Adha, also known as Bakra Eid (in the Roman language), commemorates a significant event. In the holy Quran, Allah commands Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) in a dream to sacrifice his son, Hazrat Ismail (AS), as a sign of obedience. Iblees (Shaytaan) tries to confuse Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) and tempt him to disobey, but Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) drives him away.

However, when Hazrat Ibrahim (AS) is about to sacrifice Hazrat Ismail (AS), Allah stops him. Allah sends the Angel Jibreel (AS) with a ram to sacrifice instead. Eid ul Adha, which means “sacrifice” in Arabic, is commemorated after the final day of the Hajj pilgrimage. Though it follows Hajj, it has no direct connection to it.

Muslims carry out the act of Qurbani (sacrifice) after the Eid Salaah (Eid Prayers). They perform these prayers in congregation at a large ground or mosque on the morning of Eid. Qurbani involves slaughtering an animal as a sacrifice to remember Prophet Ibrahim and his son’s sacrifice for Allah SWT. This is also known as Udhiya. Muslims have three days to slaughter their animals, from the 10th to the 12th of Dhu-al-Hijjah.
The sacrificial animal must be a camel, cow, bull, goat, ramp and sheep. To slaughter an animal in a “halal” friendly, Islamic way, it must be healthy and above a certain age. You can divide the slaughtered meat into three equal portions: one part for the poor and families in need, one part for friends, and the final third part for you and your family.

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